Please visit our sponsors

Rolclub does not endorse ads. Please see our disclaimer.
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 25
  1. #1
    Administrator Admin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Norway / Poland
    Posts
    4,601
    Feedback Score
    18 (100%)
    Thanks
    487
    Thanked 1,259 Times in 303 Posts

    Default Iranian currency Information

    Iranian rial

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


    Jump to: navigation, search
    Iranian rial
    ریال ایران (Persian)20,000 rial banknote, reverse10,000 rial banknote, obverse and reverseISO 4217 CodeIRRUser(s)IranInflation15.8%SourceThe World Factbook, 2006 est.Superunit10toman
    (unofficial)Subunit1/100dinarSymbolريالCoins50, 100, 250, 500 rialsBanknotes100, 200, 500, 1000, 2000, 5000, 10 000, 20 000 rialsCentral bankBank Markazi IranWebsitewww.cbi.irThe rial (ریال in Persian; ISO 4217 code IRR) is the currency of Iran. It is subdivided into 100 dinar but, because of the very low current value of the rial, no fraction of the rial is used in accounting.
    Although not an official currency since 1932, the toman is fequently used to express amounts of money. It enjoys wide usage among Iranians today as an amount of ten rial. Most Iranians state the value of things in toman - not rial. In fact, prices are currently most commonly marked in "toman", sometimes meaning 1000 or 1,000,000 toman (10,000 or 10,000,000 rial).
    There is no official symbol for the currency but the Iranian standard ISIRI 820 defined a symbol for use on typewriters and the two Iranian standards ISIRI 2900 and ISIRI 3342 define a character code to be used for it. The Unicode Standard has a compatibility character defined for "RIAL SIGN" [﷼] at the position U+FDFC.
    Contents


    History

    The rial was first introduced in 1798 as a coin worth 1250 dinar or one eighth of a toman. In 1825, the rial ceased to be issued, with the qiran of 1000 dinars (one tenth of a toman) being issued as part of a decimal system. The rial replaced the qiran at par in 1932, although it was divided into one hundred (new) dinars.

    Value

    In 1932, the exchange rate with the British pound was equal to that of the qiran, 1 pound = 59.75 qiran. This changed to 80.25 in 1936, 64.350 in 1939, 68.8 in 1940, 141 in 1941 and 129 in 1942. In 1945, Iran swiched to the U.S. dollar as the peg for its currency, with 1 dollar = 32.25 rial. The rate was changed to 1 dollar = 75.75 rial in 1957, a rate which was maintained until Iran did not follow the dollar's devaluation in 1973, leading to a new peg of 1 dollar = 68.725 rial. The peg to the U.S. dollar was dropped in 1975.
    In 1979, 1 rial equaled to $0.0141. The value of Iran's currency has declined precipitously after the Islamic revolution.[1]. Whereas on 15 March 1978, 71.46 rials equaled one U.S. dollar, in July 1999, 9430 rials amounted to one dollar. However, the value of rial has become more stable since 1999 as the economy of Iran has been growing rapidly and independently. (See Iran Currency Exchange Rate History: 1975 - 2006).
    Until 2002, Iran’s exchange rate system was based on a multi-layered system, where state and para-state enterprises benefited from the preferred rate (1750 rial for $1) while the private sector had to pay the market rate (8000 rial for $1), hence creating an unhealthy competition environment. However, in March 2002, the multi-tiered system was replaced by a unified, market-driven exchange rate.
    Exchange rates: rials per US dollar - 9,246.94 (2006), 8,964 (2005), 8,885 (2004), 8,193.89 (2003), 6,906.96 (2002), 1,753.56 (2001), 1,764.43 (2000)

    Coins


    First rial

    Silver coins were issued in denominations of ⅛, ¼, ½ and 1 rial.

    Second rial

    The first coins of the second rial currency were in denominations of 1, 2, 5, 10 and 25 dinar, ½, 1, 2 and 5 rial, with the ½ to 5 rial coins minted in silver. Gold coins denominated in pahlavi were also issued, initially valued at 100 rial. In 1944, the silver coinage was reduced in size, with the smallest silver coins being 1 rial pieces. This year also saw the cessation of minting of all denominations below 25 dinar. In 1945, silver 10 rial coins were introduced. In 1953, silver coins ceased to be minted, with the smallest denomination now 50 dinar. 20 rial coins were introduced in 1972.
    After the Islamic Revolution, the coinage designs were changed to remove the Shah's effigy but the sizes and compositions were not immediately changed. 50 dinar coins were only minted in 1980 and 50 rial coins were introduced in 1981. In 1993, a new coinage was introduced with smaller 1, 5, 10 and 50 rial coins and new 100 rial pieces. 250 rial coins were introduced the following year. In 2004, the sizes of the 50, 100 and 250 rial coins were reduced and 500 rial coins were introduced.
    Coins currently in circulation are 50, 100, 250 and 500 rial. The 5 and 10 rials are still legal tender but are not issued anymore.

    Banknotes

    In 1932, notes were issued by the "Bank Melli Iran" in denominations of 5, 10, 20, 50, 100 and 500 rial. 1000 rial notes were introduced in 1935, followed by 200 rial notes in 1951 and 5000 and 10,000 rial in 1952. 5 rial notes were last issued in the 1940s, with 10 rial notes disappearing in the 1960s. In 1961, the Central Bank of Iran took over the issuance of paper money.
    In 1979, after the Islamic Revolution, Iranian banknotes featuring the Shah's face were counterstamped with intricate designs to cover the Shah's face. The first regular issues of the Islamic Republic were in denominations of 100, 200, 500, 1000, 5000 and 10,000 rial. 2000 rial notes were introduced in 1986, with 20,000 rial notes added in 2003.
    Banknotes currently in circulation are 100, 200, 500, 1000, 2000, 5000, 10,000 and 20,000 rials. Portraits of Ruhollah Khomeini are found on the obverse of the 1000, 2000, 5000, 10,000 and 20,000 rials banknotes.

    Cash Cheques

    Currently the highest valued legal tender issued by the Central Bank is 20,000 rials (U.S$2.17). However, the Central Bank allows major state banks to print their own banknotes known as "Cash Cheques". They are a form of certified bearer-cheques with pre-determined amounts, printed in the form of official banknotes. Once they are acquired from banks, they work just like cash, however some stores may reject the higher value notes as they are not officially a legal tender. They are printed in 200,000, 500,000, 1,000,000, 2,000,000 and 5,000,000 rial values.[2]

    Iranian rial - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

  2. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Admin For This Useful Post:


  3. Sponsored Links
  4. #2
    Administrator Admin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Norway / Poland
    Posts
    4,601
    Feedback Score
    18 (100%)
    Thanks
    487
    Thanked 1,259 Times in 303 Posts

    Default

    Iranian Rial

    In Iran the official currency is the rial which is comprised of 100 dinars. The value of the rial is currently so insignificant that it is no longer used for accounting purposes. In 1798 the rial was first issued as a coin with a value equivalent to 1250 dinars or 1/8 of a toman. By the year 1825 the rial was no longer in existence and had been replaced by a kran which was equivalent to 1000 dinars or 1/10 of a toman. The rial re-emerged in the year 1932 when it replaced its successor the kran. The new rial was, however, subdivided into 100 dinars. The toman was no longer a form of currency but many Iranians still use this term and consider a toman to be equivalent to 10 rials.

    The Denominations of the Iranian Rial

    The irani rial is issued, by the Central Bank, in the form of both coins and banknotes. The coins in circulation include the 5, 10, 50, 100, 250 and 500 rials. There are also banknotes in circulation and they include the 100, 200, 500, 1000, 2000, 5000, 10,000 and 20,000 rials with the larger denomination bills necessarily because of the relatively low value of the rial.

    Investing in the Iranian Rial

    The current exchange rate of the Iranian rial is set at one United States dollar equal to approximately 9,072.5 Iranian rials (even more Dinar!). The Iranian rial is not considered stable and is therefore a considered a risky investment. The value of the Iranian rial is prone to spikes and dips making investing in this sensitive currency an investment that has the potential for significant losses or gains.

  5. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Admin For This Useful Post:


  6. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    California
    Posts
    259
    Feedback Score
    0
    Thanks
    263
    Thanked 335 Times in 23 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Admin View Post
    Iranian rial

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


    Jump to: navigation, search
    Iranian rial
    ریال ایران (Persian)20,000 rial banknote, reverse10,000 rial banknote, obverse and reverseISO 4217 CodeIRRUser(s)IranInflation15.8%SourceThe World Factbook, 2006 est.Superunit10toman
    (unofficial)Subunit1/100dinarSymbolريالCoins50, 100, 250, 500 rialsBanknotes100, 200, 500, 1000, 2000, 5000, 10 000, 20 000 rialsCentral bankBank Markazi IranWebsitewww.cbi.irThe rial (ریال in Persian; ISO 4217 code IRR) is the currency of Iran. It is subdivided into 100 dinar but, because of the very low current value of the rial, no fraction of the rial is used in accounting.
    Although not an official currency since 1932, the toman is fequently used to express amounts of money. It enjoys wide usage among Iranians today as an amount of ten rial. Most Iranians state the value of things in toman - not rial. In fact, prices are currently most commonly marked in "toman", sometimes meaning 1000 or 1,000,000 toman (10,000 or 10,000,000 rial).
    There is no official symbol for the currency but the Iranian standard ISIRI 820 defined a symbol for use on typewriters and the two Iranian standards ISIRI 2900 and ISIRI 3342 define a character code to be used for it. The Unicode Standard has a compatibility character defined for "RIAL SIGN" [﷼] at the position U+FDFC.
    Contents


    History

    The rial was first introduced in 1798 as a coin worth 1250 dinar or one eighth of a toman. In 1825, the rial ceased to be issued, with the qiran of 1000 dinars (one tenth of a toman) being issued as part of a decimal system. The rial replaced the qiran at par in 1932, although it was divided into one hundred (new) dinars.

    Value

    In 1932, the exchange rate with the British pound was equal to that of the qiran, 1 pound = 59.75 qiran. This changed to 80.25 in 1936, 64.350 in 1939, 68.8 in 1940, 141 in 1941 and 129 in 1942. In 1945, Iran swiched to the U.S. dollar as the peg for its currency, with 1 dollar = 32.25 rial. The rate was changed to 1 dollar = 75.75 rial in 1957, a rate which was maintained until Iran did not follow the dollar's devaluation in 1973, leading to a new peg of 1 dollar = 68.725 rial. The peg to the U.S. dollar was dropped in 1975.
    In 1979, 1 rial equaled to $0.0141. The value of Iran's currency has declined precipitously after the Islamic revolution.[1]. Whereas on 15 March 1978, 71.46 rials equaled one U.S. dollar, in July 1999, 9430 rials amounted to one dollar. However, the value of rial has become more stable since 1999 as the economy of Iran has been growing rapidly and independently. (See Iran Currency Exchange Rate History: 1975 - 2006).
    Until 2002, Iran’s exchange rate system was based on a multi-layered system, where state and para-state enterprises benefited from the preferred rate (1750 rial for $1) while the private sector had to pay the market rate (8000 rial for $1), hence creating an unhealthy competition environment. However, in March 2002, the multi-tiered system was replaced by a unified, market-driven exchange rate.
    Exchange rates: rials per US dollar - 9,246.94 (2006), 8,964 (2005), 8,885 (2004), 8,193.89 (2003), 6,906.96 (2002), 1,753.56 (2001), 1,764.43 (2000)

    Coins


    First rial

    Silver coins were issued in denominations of ⅛, ¼, ½ and 1 rial.

    Second rial

    The first coins of the second rial currency were in denominations of 1, 2, 5, 10 and 25 dinar, ½, 1, 2 and 5 rial, with the ½ to 5 rial coins minted in silver. Gold coins denominated in pahlavi were also issued, initially valued at 100 rial. In 1944, the silver coinage was reduced in size, with the smallest silver coins being 1 rial pieces. This year also saw the cessation of minting of all denominations below 25 dinar. In 1945, silver 10 rial coins were introduced. In 1953, silver coins ceased to be minted, with the smallest denomination now 50 dinar. 20 rial coins were introduced in 1972.
    After the Islamic Revolution, the coinage designs were changed to remove the Shah's effigy but the sizes and compositions were not immediately changed. 50 dinar coins were only minted in 1980 and 50 rial coins were introduced in 1981. In 1993, a new coinage was introduced with smaller 1, 5, 10 and 50 rial coins and new 100 rial pieces. 250 rial coins were introduced the following year. In 2004, the sizes of the 50, 100 and 250 rial coins were reduced and 500 rial coins were introduced.
    Coins currently in circulation are 50, 100, 250 and 500 rial. The 5 and 10 rials are still legal tender but are not issued anymore.

    Banknotes

    In 1932, notes were issued by the "Bank Melli Iran" in denominations of 5, 10, 20, 50, 100 and 500 rial. 1000 rial notes were introduced in 1935, followed by 200 rial notes in 1951 and 5000 and 10,000 rial in 1952. 5 rial notes were last issued in the 1940s, with 10 rial notes disappearing in the 1960s. In 1961, the Central Bank of Iran took over the issuance of paper money.
    In 1979, after the Islamic Revolution, Iranian banknotes featuring the Shah's face were counterstamped with intricate designs to cover the Shah's face. The first regular issues of the Islamic Republic were in denominations of 100, 200, 500, 1000, 5000 and 10,000 rial. 2000 rial notes were introduced in 1986, with 20,000 rial notes added in 2003.
    Banknotes currently in circulation are 100, 200, 500, 1000, 2000, 5000, 10,000 and 20,000 rials. Portraits of Ruhollah Khomeini are found on the obverse of the 1000, 2000, 5000, 10,000 and 20,000 rials banknotes.

    Cash Cheques

    Currently the highest valued legal tender issued by the Central Bank is 20,000 rials (U.S$2.17). However, the Central Bank allows major state banks to print their own banknotes known as "Cash Cheques". They are a form of certified bearer-cheques with pre-determined amounts, printed in the form of official banknotes. Once they are acquired from banks, they work just like cash, however some stores may reject the higher value notes as they are not officially a legal tender. They are printed in 200,000, 500,000, 1,000,000, 2,000,000 and 5,000,000 rial values.[2]

    Iranian rial - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    I,m interested, but honestly I have no Idea as to what I just read. It took me almost a year to figure out the concept of the Dinar, so be patient.
    Leann

  7. #4
    Senior Investor
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    720
    Feedback Score
    0
    Thanks
    5,345
    Thanked 934 Times in 88 Posts

    Default

    I will look at Iran when they have new owners in the house...............

  8. #5
    Member buddy54's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    94
    Feedback Score
    0
    Thanks
    28
    Thanked 134 Times in 18 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by goldraker View Post
    I will look at Iran when they have new owners in the house...............
    I agree i wil do the same

  9. #6
    Senior Investor investor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    885
    Feedback Score
    1 (100%)
    Thanks
    118
    Thanked 258 Times in 72 Posts

    Default

    Don't think investing in Iran is a good idea any time soon.

    The way things are going, there's going to be a lot of sand turned into glass.

  10. #7
    Senior Investor
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    585
    Feedback Score
    0
    Thanks
    648
    Thanked 1,659 Times in 108 Posts

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by investor View Post
    Don't think investing in Iran is a good idea any time soon.

    The way things are going, there's going to be a lot of sand turned into glass.
    Now that, was a correct and Intelligent answer. No way I can top that post.

    Thanks, Gloribee

  11. #8
    Senior Investor
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    720
    Feedback Score
    0
    Thanks
    5,345
    Thanked 934 Times in 88 Posts

    Default

    Iran could be toppled and annexed as the 51st state of the USA! That would be awesome! Give us a BIG Iraqi RV, then take over Iran. Then we acquire their currency by the truck load! Then wait until the USA trades their currency 1 for 1 for the USA dollar! Now that's a successful plan man!

  12. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    215
    Feedback Score
    0
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 154 Times in 44 Posts

    Default

    The only thing that interests me about Iran is the possibility of NUKING them.

  13. #10
    Investor
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    the SHOW ME state
    Posts
    326
    Feedback Score
    0
    Thanks
    26
    Thanked 30 Times in 9 Posts

    Default

    i asked this question in another forum, would it be considered a bad idea to invest in the rial?
    money cant buy happiness, but you can rent it for a few days.

    2 wrongs dont make a right, but 3 rights make a left.

  14. Sponsored Links
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Share |